Towards Retirement And Beyond

The big transition!

After various conversations over time I began to focus on the experience of moving towards, through and into retirement, and what I might offer in support. I guess at first I thought I had it sussed, having previously worked on Released Not retired Or Redundant. But it became clear that whilst some practical and creative assumptions about age and redundacy are true for retirement, a deeper process takes place as the body ages and society begins to put you into a category you maybe don’t really recognise or even want.

It’s a phase of huge repurposing. Once you were a child of maybe 14 years old, and life however daunting lay before you, but along the way life as it does, reshapes what you once hoped for or expected. For forty years plus you were pursuing dreams, perhaps just surviving, and maybe pretending that at some point you as you were heading towards 70 your feet would stop scrabbling in the grit, allowing you to grab a space to work out what the hell was going on. Too often the ‘getting on with it’ means no time to reflect on who, and maybe what you are now. No thoughts around increasing your relationship with yourself and others. No getting your head around what comes next. Maybe it an old habit of pretending if you are busy nothing bad can touch you?

Age is linear and has a fixed outcome but that path does not have to be diminishing or boring, it be rich, funny and full of discovery.

As I work towards a supportive workshop/course that builds perspective, reslience allowing and encouraging reflective expression through the arts I would welcome any thoughts you may feel able to with me. kevinshome@me.com

May 2021 smile on you.

Kevin

Some areas of exploration

Developing a time line – a new approach Imagery in everyday life lateral thinking the power of simplicity in art appreciative inquiry tools for resilience relationships emotions

The Rules For Creativity?

Rule 1: Feel safe to explore.

Rule 2: Never stop searching for stimulus.

Rule 3: Allow time for open meditation rather than focused meditation. One allows the mind to wander creatively and the other focuses the mind on one thing such as the breath.

Rule 4: Everything is an experiment.

Rule 5: Fight the inner interference that stops you working. Remember P = p – i (Performance equals potential minus our minds imposter syndrome interference)

Rule 6: Nothing is a mistake, there is only make

Rule 7: Don’t create and analyse at the same time, they’re different processes

Rule 8: THE ONLY RULE IS WORK. If you work it will lead to something. Its the people who do the work who catch on to things.

Rule 9: Be happy whenever you can manage it. Enjoy yourself, its lighter than you think.

Rule 10: ” We’re breaking all of the rules. Even our own rules, and how do we do that? By leaving plenty of room for X quantities’ John Cage

Apapted from the work of “Sister’ Mary Kent, who revolutionised graphic design and encouraged the creativity of thousands of people.

Draw Up. Draw In, Drawing

Drawing, that thing that most people do even if it’s an absent minded doodle. Drawing, that process that art schools condemned not so very long ago, but is now right back in fashion (it never really went away for most of us). Drawing, that thing that needs constant practice. Drawing, that thing that helps you develop your own language for expression. Drawing, that thing that thing where people say, ‘oh that’s good,’ ‘that’s not right, but mind you, I’m rubbish at drawing.’

No two people draw alike. Your drawings are as distinctive as your handwriting

I have always made myself work. Don’t just sit staring at the daunting, expectant paper. Just put something down – hopefully it wll lead to another thing, and before you know it the drawing may be underway like a slow locomotive pulling out of the station before it speeds down the track. Gerald Scarfe, The Long Drawn Out Trip, Little Brown 2019. https://www.geraldscarfe.com

The moment you put down two or three marks on a piece of paper, you get relationships. They’ll start to look like something. If you draw two little lines they might look like two figures or two trees. One was made first, one second. We read all kinds of things into marks. You can suggest landscape, people and faces with extremely little. It all depends on the human ability to see a mark as a depiction. David Hockney, http://www.hockney.com/works/drawings/2010s

Drawing could start anywhere. A crayon scuffs paper and the child holding it sees a mark emerge. A brush runs along a batten and look, there is a line. Yhe skid of a swung stick describes fine curves in the sand; the effects of our actions interest us and we make further marks. A zone of attention forms. Within this mental zone, whatever dots, edges or curves we produce seem to gang up and find ways of relating to one another- rhythms, behaviour patterns. Julian Bell. Ways of Drawing, Thames and Hudson 2019. https://www.royaldrawingschool.org

How Drawing Can Set You Free www.ted.com/talks/shantell_martin_how_drawing_can_set_you_free

Draw up, draw in, draw something today!

5 Objects and Some Flowers

If you were to prepare a still life using 5 objects that symbolize what was most important to you in your life so far what would they be?

How would you arrange these objects or metaphors?

Flowers bring colour and a need for light, they offer beauty, smell, seasonality etc. and evoke memories.

Would you photograph them, paint/draw them, make a model of them, just write prose/poetry about them – maybe I’ll draw something from the prose/poetry? The objects are few but the possibilities are up to you

The last sentence is the clue. I’m interested in you sending photograps or documents to me,(kevinshome@me.com) to see how they collectively emerge and what is evoked in me as an artist when I receive whatever you offer.

This idea is based on an original idea of Charles and Elizabeth Handy